Start Submission

Reading: Teaching Without Explication: Pedagogical Lessons from Rancière’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster ...

Download

A- A+
dyslexia friendly

Articles

Teaching Without Explication: Pedagogical Lessons from Rancière’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster in The Grand Budapest Hotel and The Emperor’s Club

Author:

David LaRocca

State University of New York College, US
About David

David LaRocca is Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the State University of New York College at Cortland; Visiting Scholar in the Department of English at Cornell University; and Lecturer in Screen Studies in the Department of Cinema, Photography, and Media Arts at the Roy H. Park School of Communications at Ithaca College. His latest monograph is Emerson’s English Traits and the Natural History of Metaphor (2013), and he edited Stanley Cavell’s Emerson’s Transcendental Etudes (2003). He is also the editor of The Philosophy of Charlie Kaufman (2011), The Philosophy of War Films (2014), and The Philosophy of Documentary Film: Image, Sound, Fiction, Truth (2017). For more information: www.davidlarocca.org

X close

Abstract

How can one teach what one does not know? Most film depictions of teaching follow a satisfying (and it would seem endlessly entertaining) Aristotelian dramatic structure. But what if the teacher does not know what she is summoned to teach? And what if there were a theory of pedagogy that celebrated a teacher's ignorance rather than her authority (power, position, privilege, pre-established role) or expertise (knowledge, experience, judgment)? How or why, in Jacques Rancière’s parlance, an ‘ignorant schoolmaster’ may have a talent for teaching – that is, an efficacy and influence on student learning that trumps antecedent knowledge – becomes a locus of inquiry in these pages. Several of Wes Anderson’s films can be said to include an ignorant schoolmaster, or ‘New Master’. Arguably, The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) features the highest achievement of expression of the ignorant schoolmaster in Anderson’s work: M. Gustave teaches without knowing, teaches inadvertently as he learns what needs to be taught. By way of contrast – that is, as a way of illuminating M. Gustave’s representative qualities as an ignorant schoolmaster – I will also consider the character of the professional, authoritative, and knowledgeable preparatory school teacher, or 'Old Master', William Hundert in The Emperor's Club (2002).

 

How to Cite: LaRocca, D., (2016). Teaching Without Explication: Pedagogical Lessons from Rancière’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster in The Grand Budapest Hotel and The Emperor’s Club. JOMEC Journal. (10), pp.84–98. DOI: http://doi.org/10.18573/j.2016.10089
8
Views
6
Downloads
Published on 23 Dec 2016.
Peer Reviewed

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)