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Reading: Event, Weak Pedagogy, and Shattered Love in John Williams' Stoner

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Event, Weak Pedagogy, and Shattered Love in John Williams' Stoner

Author:

Éamonn Dunne

Trinity College Dublin, IE
About Éamonn

Éamonn Dunne is a research scholar at the School of Education, Trinity College Dublin. He is currently living and teaching in Bangkok, Thailand, and working on a book on events of unlearning and the philosophy of weak pedagogy. He is the author of J. Hillis Miller and the Possibilities of Reading: Literature after Deconstruction (Continuum, 2010), Reading Theory Now (Bloomsbury, 2013) and, with Aidan Seery, The Pedagogics of Unlearning (Punctum, 2016). Research interests include philosophies of the event, radical pedagogies, and literature and trauma.

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Abstract

What do we mean when we talk about events? Can we even (really) say we know what an ‘event’ is? To begin thinking about teaching in terms of the event is to begin thinking about all of those things that happen in our classrooms that we don’t and can’t control. Thinking the event means thinking about the unthinkable, the unforeseeable and ultimately the unknowable. It is about letting go of a concept – almost impossible to relinquish – that teaching and learning are transparent entities: understandable, limitable, predictable, something we can and do know about. Thinking about the event is thinking about what actually happens, not what we think should or ought to happen in our classrooms.

How to Cite: Dunne, É., (2016). Event, Weak Pedagogy, and Shattered Love in John Williams' Stoner. JOMEC Journal. (10), pp.75–83. DOI: http://doi.org/10.18573/j.2016.10088
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Published on 23 Dec 2016.
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